child asthma

Every parent wants the best for their child, especially when it comes to their health. But what happens when your child is diagnosed with a health issue? Parents and kids can find it a rough go at first as they learn what this means to them, their daily life, and their future.

If your child has been diagnosed with asthma, it’s normal to feel shocked, sadness, and anger that they now have a health issue they need to deal with. Before getting too caught up in the emotions and stress, here’s a look at the basics of asthma, and what to do if your child has been diagnosed with it.

What is Asthma?

While the diagnosis of asthma may have come as a shock to you, the fact is that’s about seven million children in the United States suffer from it. While any person of any age can develop asthma, it usually begins in childhood. Asthma is described as a chronic lung disease that actually narrows the person’s airways, which can make it hard to breathe.

Typical signs of asthma include a wheezing sound when the person is breathing, a shortness of breath, chest tightness, and coughing. The coughing tends to flare up in the morning and at night in most sufferers. A person can suffer from a severe form of asthma or a mild form, and it can change over the years. While there is no cure for asthma, sometimes it can go away on its own.

What Treatment is Available?

Even though this is no cure for asthma, there are a number of available that act as excellent treatment options. These medications include such popular options as Advair, Atrovent, Brethine, Flovent, and plenty more. Your doctor will work with you to find the best treatment for your child. Treatment will depend on the severity of the asthma, your child’s triggers, their health, and other factors.

What is an Asthma Flare-Up?

Even though asthma is a chronic condition, it does have what is called flare-ups. This means it is worse at certain times. Flare-ups are typically brought on by a trigger which can be something such as illness (a respiratory infection), allergies, exercise, etc. During a flare-up, the symptoms will be much worse, and your child may need to take their medication in order to help open their airways.

During these flare-ups, the inflammation in their lungs gets much worse. Therefore it becomes much harder to get air in. A flare up should be taken seriously and may even require emergency medical attention.

What Can You Do to Help Your Child?

Besides making sure they get their medication when needed, there are some things you can do around the home to lessen the odds of an asthma flare-up. Ideally, you want to eliminate all the triggers in the home. Keeping allergens at bay is a big thing, which means regular dusting, vacuuming, and washing. Get rid of irritants such as perfumes, hair spray, and room sprays. Pets can also act as triggers due to their dander.

While it’s never ideal to have a child diagnosed with a chronic health issue, learning all you can about asthma will certainly help make you and your child feel more comfortable and prepared.

 

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!